COURSE CATALOG

2018-2019

 

Table of Contents

     i. Year One
     ii. Year Two
     v. Year Five
pcop
pcop
pcop
pcop

Adult Psychoanalytic Program

The curriculum for training in psychoanalysis is tripartite, including: the personal analysis, supervised clinical work, and didactic seminars.  The Center has a well-respected, scholarly faculty that ably conveys the complexity of psychoanalytic thinking today.  The didactic curriculum consists of a series of seminars, given weekly over five years, designed to impart a thorough knowledge of psychoanalytic theory beginning with Freud’s discovery of the unconscious mind and encompassing conflict theory, ego psychology, object relations theory, perspectives on narcissism, and relational theory.

The curriculum keeps abreast of contemporary issues such as gender theory, trauma theory, research in child development, and findings in neuroscience.  Technique is taught in seminars and in Continuous Case Conferences, in which a single case is followed over the duration of the course. Development from infancy to adulthood is studied in a six-course sequence. Years Four and Five study special topics in Advanced Electives.  An active Curriculum Committee reviews courses and explores ways in which new areas of knowledge may be incorporated into the program. Candidate representatives participate as voting members on the Curriculum Committee.

Classes are held weekly on Wednesdays at Rockland Mansion, E. Fairmount Park, 3810 Mt. Pleasant Drive, Philadelphia, PA 19121.  Starting and ending times of classes vary from year to year.

All class sessions are one hour and fifteen minutes long, and each session offers 1.25 CE/CME credits. Specific class information (date, time, location, instructor) will be provided to students upon acceptance to the program.

 

 

YEAR ONE

Affect and Resistance

10 sessions

This course will discuss the role of affect, emotion and feeling in psychoanalytic theory and practice: what they have to do with psychological healing in general and psychoanalytic healing in particular, with psychological knowledge in general and psychoanalytic knowledge in particular and with the process through which the unconscious becomes conscious, both in life and in psychoanalysis. Among the specific topics covered will be transference, countertransference, resistance, enactment, the relationship between affects and drives and the role of affect in personality organization.

This course will also discuss the history of how people have thought about affect, both outside psychoanalysis and within psychoanalysis. This discussion will include a thorough review of the evolution of Freud’s thinking about affect (and how it is closely related to the evolution of his thinking about the meaning of life), the evolution of psychoanalytic thinking about affect since Freud, the impact of Silvan Tomkins’s affect theory on psychoanalysis, and the place of affect in the current debate between traditional and relational/intersubjectivist models of psychoanalytic process.

 

Basic Psychoanalytic Process

10 sessions

This course will attempt to define the fundamental components of the psychoanalytic process and consider, in depth, essential concepts related to the analytic process such as free association, transference and countertransference, resistance, interpretation, and working through.  It will also address theoretical and clinical issues relating to the role of the analyst, such as analytic listening and the delivery of interpretive interventions.

 

Beginning Analysis

5 sessions

The aim of these five sessions is to give you a broad overview of basic aspects of the psychoanalytic situation, attitude, process, and technique.  Almost everything that we go over will be covered in more detail in later courses.  Our aim here is to give you a preliminary vision as to how all these things tie together.  I emphasize the broadness and the sweep of the material we are going to cover to prepare you for the sense of being overwhelmed and slightly confused, which is inevitable when you tackle such a broad field.

 

Beginning Phase Case Conference

10 sessions 

From the perspective of Modern Classical Theory and using clinical material from ongoing analyses, this course will emphasize basic psychoanalytic principals of especial importance in the opening phase.  These principles include:  early resistance interpretation, listening for unconscious fantasy, use of clarifications and avoidance of the early use of interpretation, use of dreams in analysis, when to interpret extra-transference vs. transference, among others.

 

Defense and Resistance

5 sessions

The purpose of this course is to provide you with a brief overview of defense and resistance, as it manifests itself within the clinical process.  By clinical process, I mean to bring together its fundamental role in the psychology of all individuals and how honoring defense and resistance plays a singularly important role in deepening the clinical process safely, thus allowing for an emotionally transformative experience in psychoanalysis, while at the same time, the deepening of ever more powerful and complex affects, cognitions and unconscious fantasies can be scary for the patient and analyst, leading to complex, tricky and potentially transformative transference and countertransference enactments of defense and resistance.  I hope to emphasize this dynamic, mutually focused perspective to each week, even as we establish the basics of defense and resistance in psychoanalytic theory and practice in the first two weeks.

 

Development: Infancy

5 sessions

Understanding the first years of life may help us to better understand and work with some of the vicissitudes of our adult patients.  However, development is complex, transformational, and non-linear, and there is not a one-to-one relationship between adult experience, adult memory, and the reconstructions of analysis and actual infant experience. However, early and profound interactional patterns and psychophysiologic regulation are laid down in the first year of life. Through the lens of understanding this year, we may enhance our understanding of basic nonverbal culturally based interactional patterns that underlie all relationships and senses of self and other throughout the course of life. 

The purpose of this course is to give you some knowledge and understanding about development in the first year. We will also bring in some possible implications for working with older children, adolescents, and adults in psychoanalysis and psychotherapy.  

 

Development: Toddlerhood

5 sessions

This course focuses on the developmental issues that emerge in the second and third years of life. These include: separation/individuation; autonomy; shame; aggression; words and symbolization; object constancy; the discovery of sexual differences; and the development of inner conflict. We will explore the above issues from a psychoanalytic theoretical perspective while simultaneously making use of a developmental perspective to further our understanding. In addition we will look at the multiple determinants of behavior; intrapsychic functioning; and the dynamic interaction between child and family/environment.

These factors provide the underpinnings for technique. While this is not a technique course, and we will concentrate on theory, it is useful to keep in mind how these factors speak to the therapeutic relationship, interpretation and intervention, and clinical challenges. It is useful to contemplate the interplay between theory, clinical concepts and practice.

 

Metapsychology

5 sessions

Papers on Freud’s “Metapsychology” represent a significant fragment of his efforts to gather together a complete statement of his conceptualization, really his philosophy of psychoanalysis.  They address key concepts including: drive, repression, the unconscious, the psychology of the dream processes, a seminal essay on object relations in mourning and melancholia, and one on psychic structures.

 

Motivation and Drives

5 sessions

It has been left to later scholars to further develop Freud’s ideas, many of who continued to pair development and psychopathology in an outgrowth of clinical work and research with children. Fairbairn, Bowlby, Sullivan, Mitchell and others have described object seeking or need for attachment and relationship as an additional, or even superordinate, motivating force to classical pleasure seeking drives. Kohut, Sandler, Loewald and intersubjective writers evolved Freud’s concept of ego instincts to describe the emergence of self and subjectivity. Our plan for this course is to for you to become familiar with the basic tenants of motivation theory as they pertain to the major psychoanalytic schools of thought: classical theory, Kleinian theory, object relation theory, attachment theory, intersubjective and relational theory.  We hope that becoming familiar with the differences and similarities of these perspectives and discussing motivational processes in clinical material will illuminate these processes in your own clinical work, and help you recognize that uncertainty is a natural state for psychoanalysts working to find meaning with their patients.

 

North American Object Relations

5 sessions

This course presents an introduction to the development of object relations theory in North American psychoanalysis and to the specific and varied thinking of some of its proponents. The intention of the course is to show the natural progression of the object relations perspective out of earlier instinct theory and ego psychology. The course will emphasize those thinkers who tended to integrate their perspective with the pre-existing body of psychoanalytic thought. The writings of Hans Loewald will act as the backbone of the course and will serve admirably to accomplish this goal. Also illustrated will be the thinking of Margaret Mahler, Arnold Modell, and Otto Kernberg, whose writings will be paired with those of Loewald.

 

Orientation to History of Psychoanalysis

5 sessions

Elizabeth Young-Bruehl's 100 Years of Psychoanalysis: 1900-2000 will be the anchor for the course. The readings focus on turning points in the history and pre-history of psychoanalysis. (Due to time limitations, we will stop at the theory of object relations.) Ideally, each of us develops a personal map of theory over a lifetime. Candidates will be introduced to others' maps and will develop an individualized way to track their own learning. This toolbox may be modified and expanded through candidacy and beyond.

 

Psychoanalytic Listening

5 sessions

In this course on psychoanalytic listening, we hope to help you develop an understanding of a different way of listening – a psychoanalytic way of listening.  We will read about different ways of being able to listen to what our patients tell us.  This will include being able to listen to different layers of meaning in what patients tell us – listening about past and present, conscious and unconscious, and different object relationships, including the transference relationship.  We will also talk about what we might say in relation to what we understand about these communications from our patients.  We will read from different historical periods of psychoanalysis, starting with Freud, and ranging into the more recent psychoanalytic era.  We will also ask you to write about what you read, emphasizing critical reading, and our working together to pose questions to facilitate discussion of the material.  You will see that the field has gradually created room for the idea of countertransference, in which we listen not only to what the patient says and implies via his/her body language, but we also listen to what we are feeling and thinking as we listen.  We then make some decisions about how we incorporate those thoughts and feelings into what we might say.  Finally, it will be essential for you to bring vignettes from your clinical work to illustrate some of the principles we read about and discuss; there is no substitute for practical experience as it arises in our every day work.

 

Structural Theory: Ego and Superego

10 sessions

The course will trace the evolution of Freud’s thinking as he worked to develop a model of the mind.  At the heart of his theorizing, he wanted his model to reflect the central role of mental conflict and compromise.  We will start with the pre-psychoanalytic observations on conflict, followed by his early model—the topographic model.  We will then consider the empirical problems with this model and its later revisions in the structural model.  We will consider various features of the structural model, as well as some of the limitations and subsequent reformulations.  We will examine the shifts in emphasis and complexity, and we will look at these in the context of an evolving cultural and psychoanalytic milieu. 

For three classes, we will examine the superego as the primary generator of inner conflict. We will discuss two dimensions of what Freud called "Das Über-Ich." The first dimension corresponds to the "superego" (Strachey's translation of Freud's term) as it is generally understood: as an internalization of parental and societal restrictions and prohibitions. This dimension is an automatic unconsciously reactive punitive agency that becomes integrated with the id and the ego to constitute the personality. The other dimension corresponds to a more accurate translation of Freud's German term: "The Above-I" or "The I that stands above." This dimension is what is commonly known as higher consciousness, meta-consciousness, or self-reflective consciousness, one of whose functions is moral consciousness or conscience. This self-reflective consciousness is integral to the autonomous integrative Self, which transcends and assimilates the three agencies of the unconsciously reactive personality, id, ego, and superego. We will discuss how both dimensions of "Das Über-Ich" participate in the psychoanalytic process.

 

Writing Seminar

5 sessions

The purpose of this course is to prepare you to write case write-ups describing the work you do with your analytic patients. Psychoanalytic case writing may be quite different from other forms of clinical reports that you have mastered. I hope that you will come to experience the process of writing as a helpful and creative way to deepen your understanding of your control cases, and that you will feel encouraged to share your writing with your peers in the future.

To best facilitate these goals, I will focus on the process of writing itself, rather than inundating you with multiple papers about writing, as there is no better way to procrastinate on a report than by reading! Most weeks will you have one assigned short reading, which we will discuss briefly and then utilize the key points to conduct writing exercises.

Be prepared to present material from analytic cases if possible, but note that psychotherapy cases may also be presented if necessary. Note that by week 4 you will be expected to have completed a 5-page case report that briefly summarizes the course of treatment with a patient and provides examples of psychoanalytic process.

 

 

YEAR TWO

 

Female Psychology

10 sessions

This course examines female psychology beginning with Freud's initial formulation and noting modifications and innovations within the framework of psychoanalytic theory. Recent contributions from direct infant observation are studied.

 

Development: Early Genital and Oedipal Phase

10 sessions

The Oedipal phase: many developmental issues emerge strongly during these years. Oedipal fantasy is the result of and allows for the modulation of sexuality and aggression; the ability to distinguish reality from fantasy; psychic equivalence and pretend mode; the capacity for mentalization and self-reflection; and the capacity for guilt and conscience; and enhanced gender identity and gender consolidation.

 

Transference

5 sessions

The psychoanalytic literature on transference is rich and varied. While many current papers address the intertwining of transference and countertransference, in this course we will read work focused principally on transference. One objective will be to obtain a solid perspective on the evolution of thought on the subject from Freud’s 1912 “Dynamics of Transference” through the century following, including contemporary controversies representing different theoretical and clinical points of view. Another objective is to consider the clinical use of transference and how the transference is experienced and dealt with by the practicing analyst or therapist. The clinical aspect of transference is already present in Freud’s writings and we will see how today’s analysts agree or differ with Freud’s ideas. Many of our readings will illustrate theory with extensive clinical material, giving us much to discuss about work with or within the transference as the aspect of practice that, for many, defines what we as analysts do differently from other clinicians.

 

Counter-Transference

5 sessions

This course will begin with an overview of the development of psychoanalytic thinking about countertransference. We will discuss the impact of analytic training on candidates’ countertransference. We will then move forward to various contemporary views of countertransference, including enactments, role-responsiveness, and the analytic third. We will explore the analyst’s love, hate, and erotic longing for the analysand, as well as various common contertransference formations: e.g. with analysands who are experienced as needful, demanding, loving, boring, appreciative, contemptuous, sadistic, hateful, or unappreciative. Participants are encouraged to bring in clinical examples of countertransference and enactments. The syllabus includes readings by Gabbard, Jacobs, Winnicott, Casement, McLaughlin, Ogden, Katz, and Davies.

 

Interpreting Dreams I

5 sessions

The first two sessions will start where the understanding of dreams itself started: with Freud. The course focuses on clinical approaches, but the first step in working clinically with dreams is understanding them, and that means thoroughly knowing dream theory. You can’t use dreams in your practice without understanding them.  As the Talmud says, “A dream which has not been explained is like a letter which has not been read.”  Like all mental phenomena, dreams have many meanings, and they can be interpreted from many different viewpoints.  But it all started with Freud, so that’s where the course begins. Throughout the course, students work with real dreams and present a dream each session.

 

Gender and Sexuality

10 sessions

In recent years, the cutting edge of theory on sex and gender has been marked by a return to Freud’s Three Essays on Sexuality and their radical elaboration of infantile sexuality and the fate of the sexual drive in human development. Major feminist and queer theorists have used Freud’s writings as the starting point of critiques of cultural practices as well as of psychoanalytic theory and practice.  For most of the mid-twentieth century the psychoanalytic mainstream focused on the developmental narrative of reproductive heterosexuality, in sync with the social and legal suppression of non-normative sexualities in the surrounding culture.  A re-theorizing has occurred on both sides of the Atlantic, and with very different psychoanalytic inflections accordingly.  Drive theorists, self-psychologists, object-relational, relational, inter-subjectivists, attachment theorists, Lacanians—all approach (or avoid) the subject differently.

This ten week course will attempt to do the following:  survey the psychoanalytic writings on sexuality from Freud’s Three Essays on Sexuality (1905) to the present; identify fault lines in theoretical approaches, including the ways in which theories of sexuality tend to lean on a variety of normative or developmental narratives, whether biological, cultural or moral ones; re-consider the status of the seduction theory; and, question the usefulness of the concept of perversion.  We will make use of Jean Laplanche’s Freud and the Sexual, as well as a broad sampling of the most illuminating and provocative writers on the subject including Judith Butler, Muriel Dimen, Leo Bersani, Peter Fonagy and Ruth Stein.

 

Relational Theory I

5 sessions

In this course we will focus on some of the key topics and concepts in Relational Psychoanalysis. Relational Psychoanalysis is relatively new (beginning in the 1980s) and it draws from a range of psychoanalytic schools of thought, including  object relations theory, interpersonal psychoanalysis, self-psychology, neo-Kleinian theory, and contemporary Freudian theory. There has been some debate as to whether this is evolution or revolution.  That is something you might want to consider as you read these papers. While this is a theory course, I think it is important to also keep a clinical focus. Therefore, as you read, think about your patients and what you might find useful for your own work. Consider also while reading how these shifts in theory result in shifts in the meaning of some central analytic concepts, and what are the implications for technique. For example: How do we come to know the patient? What is the mode of therapeutic action? What is the role of insight? How do we understand the nature of mind? How do we understand transference and countertransference?

 

Child Continuous Case Conference

15 sessions

Adult division candidates will join child division candidates to hear a single child case, which is presented over the entire fourteen weeks. Issues of technique and understanding of the case are discussed. This course complements the Development course given this year.

 

Neurosis

10 sessions

This course will attempt to impart an understanding of neurotic process, in particular in relationship to hysteria, phobia, and obsessive-compulsive neurosis. The class will read Freud’s cases on these subjects, as well as relevant contemporary literature; we will try to read, or at least infer, some of the intellectual history in the periods between then and now. It will also be important to try to understand something of the relationship of analytic ideas to current thinking on these topics in general psychiatry and psychology. The course will begin with a class on symptom and character formation. We will consider questions of how symptoms and character form, along with the relation between the two; how do symptoms affect, transform into, emerge from, character? These are questions we should continue to contemplate throughout the remainder of the course (and beyond).

We will proceed with four sessions covering hysteria and phobia, including Dora and Little Hans, followed by three sessions covering hysteria and phobia, including Rat Man. Some additional questions to consider: What distinguishes these diagnostic categories? How identifiable and discrete are they? Is it clinically useful to use these classifications? If so, how?

Symptoms are not limited to the traditional categories. For Session 9 I have introduced a class on sexual symptoms (impotence, premature ejaculation, anorgasmia, “frigidity”, etc.) which are very important in analytic practice, do not fall neatly into the preceding categories, and which seem seldom to be explicitly brought into analytic curricula. 

 

Adult Continuous Case Conference

10 sessions

The central aim and focus of this continuous case is to learn from the case material, learn from each other and to share our analytic ideas, approaches and views.  The case will be a springboard for discussion. The overarching theme will be looking at resistance from many different facets. It should be noted that this theme is loosely devised and we have the flexibility to move in the direction that is inspired by the case material and the group.  In order to help facilitate these discussions we have organized a reading list. While we will touch upon the reading we do not want the reading to be a “resistance” to get into the case material. So the reading is there as a guide with the hopes that it exposes you to some material that can help further facilitate thinking, reflecting on the clinical material and our discussions. 

 

Unconscious Fantasy

5 sessions

This course will examine the concept of fantasy in clinical work. We will explore the interplay of unconscious fantasies of analyst and patient and examine ways in which this dynamic can impede or advance analytic process. Fantasies of young children will be included, as we examine the concept of fantasy from a developmental basis as well. Candidates will have an opportunity to present clinical material in examining fantasies from patients.

 

 

YEAR THREE

 

Adolescent Continuous Case Conference

15 sessions

The central aim and focus of this continuous case is to learn from the case material, learn from each other and to share our analytic ideas, approaches and views.  The case will be a springboard for discussion. The overarching theme will be looking at resistance from many different facets. It should be noted that this theme is loosely devised and we have the flexibility to move in the direction that is inspired by the case material and the group.  In order to help facilitate these discussions we have organized a reading list. While we will touch upon the reading we do not want the reading to be a “resistance” to get into the case material. So the reading is there as a guide with the hopes that it exposes you to some material that can help further facilitate thinking, reflecting on the clinical material and our discussions. 

 

Development: Latency

5 sessions 

In the first session an adult case will be presented in which latency tasks were disrupted and the pathology manifested will be discussed in light of this. We will also discuss the sub-phases of latency especially the transition from the oedipal stage into the early latency phase. The second session we will discuss the tasks, cognitive changes and elaboration of defenses of latency i.e. latency proper. The third session we will return to the adult case and use material from a child case to discuss Charles Sarnoff’s ideas about the use of fantasy during latency to express and contain unacceptable impulses. The fourth and fifth session will involve a discussion of the transition between latency and adolescence (i.e. preadolescence) with case material.

 

Narcissism

10 sessions 

This course examines the development of psychoanalytic conceptions of narcissism starting with Freud's 1914 paper. The ideas in this paper both contributed to an elucidation of the concept of narcissism and to the confusion surrounding it. Later papers exploring the elaboration of Freud's ideas in attempts to clarify the uses and meanings of this concept are also critically read and examined. The course also provides an introduction to the theoretical innovations of Self Psychology and the work of Heinz Kohut and his colleagues.

 

Development: Adolescence

5 sessions

This course reviews the physical development and physiological changes as a backdrop for the psychological challenges that face the child as he/she matures from latency into an adult sized and adult equipped person. These challenges include what to do with the new equipment, increased and elaborated urges stimulated by changing hormonal balances, increasing independence and social demands. We then move on to different conceptualizations of normative adolescent psychological development. We evaluate these conceptualizations with clinical material either from the literature or brought in by students. The goal is to come away with a working conceptualization of adolescence informed by the literature.

 

Trauma: Theory & Technique

10 sessions 

This course provides an overview of contemporary analytic thinking about trauma, linking it with classical psychoanalytic views, trauma theory, and current psychiatric thinking. There is particular emphasis on such topics as developmental considerations (with an emphasis on attachment), repetition, enactments, reconstruction, traumatic memory, trauma-related disruptions of memory, the inter-generational transmission of trauma, the impact of trauma upon transference and countertransference, dissociative psychopathology, and modifications of technique in response to trauma-related psychopathology.

 

Interpreting Dreams II

5 sessions

The course will build on the “Interpreting Dreams” course by integrating clinical material with readings and discussion about the different ways in which dreams inform the analytic process. Examples of how this may occur include dreams with close ties to the transference, dreams that speak to the patient’s unconscious experience of an enactment, the analyst’s dreams about patients, and dreams that address themes at different parts of the treatment, including the patient’s first dream and dreams that emerge during the termination phase. We will also talk about if, when, and how to intervene in response to dream material (e.g., timing, tact, dosage) as well as different ways of formulating clinical interventions and tracking the patient’s subsequent associations in response to the dream.

 

Adult Continuous Case Conference

10 sessions 

The central aim and focus of this continuous case is to learn from the case material, learn from each other and to share our analytic ideas, approaches and views.  The case will be a springboard for discussion. The overarching theme will be looking at resistance from many different facets. It should be noted that this theme is loosely devised and we have the flexibility to move in the direction that is inspired by the case material and the group.  In order to help facilitate these discussions we have organized a reading list. While we will touch upon the reading we do not want the reading to be a “resistance” to get into the case material. So the reading is there as a guide with the hopes that it exposes you to some material that can help further facilitate thinking, reflecting on the clinical material and our discussions.

 

Enactments

5 sessions

Some questions to consider as we go: Definitions of enactment, broad, narrow, and otherwise. Are enactments inevitable?  To be avoided?  Part and parcel of the analytic process? Are there enactments that are inherent in the psychoanalytic process? Are there factors that push toward enactments?  What might these be? Do enactments promote or hinder the analytic process?  How? How and when are enactments best interpreted?  How is the concept of enactment related to questions of self-disclosure?  Is self-disclosure inevitable in resolving an enactment?  What sort of self-disclosure? Are enactments with suicidal patients similar or different from those with other patients? How are enactments related to boundary crossings and boundary violations?

 

 

YEAR FOUR

Adult Continuous Case Conference

10 sessions 

The central aim and focus of this continuous case is to learn from the case material, learn from each other and to share our analytic ideas, approaches and views.  The case will be a springboard for discussion. The overarching theme will be looking at resistance from many different facets. It should be noted that this theme is loosely devised and we have the flexibility to move in the direction that is inspired by the case material and the group.  In order to help facilitate these discussions we have organized a reading list. While we will touch upon the reading we do not want the reading to be a “resistance” to get into the case material. So the reading is there as a guide with the hopes that it exposes you to some material that can help further facilitate thinking, reflecting on the clinical material and our discussions. 

 

Advanced Psychoanalytic Process

5 sessions 

The Psychoanalytic Process is the bedrock of our clinical work. It is what we look for in defining psychoanalysis, cure, graduation and certification. At the same time it is an elusive concept – inter-rater reliability is weak though the stridency of various proponents is strong. We will be studying and comparing different authors’ views of the psychoanalytic process and noting how it relates to their theories of cure.

 

Depression

5 sessions 

This course will deal with clinical and theoretical aspects of the broad range of depressive states. It will consider the nature of depressive affect, the role of the superego, narcissistic injury, conflict, loss, separation, and early maternal deprivation. Issues of psychoanalytic treatment will also be discussed.

 

Development: Adult

5 sessions 

This course will explore the psychological aspects of development through the adult life cycle. Calvin Colarusso’s work in this area is prolific and we will be reading several of his articles. We will seek to understand the unique nature of development in adulthood by identifying the specific tasks and challenges that arise from young adulthood through very old age. The application of this knowledge to our analytic work will be woven into each session and in our final class we will synthesize our learning with the exploration of a case presentation.

 

Ethics

5 sessions 

This course on Ethics hopes to highlight ethical concerns, conflicts, and dilemmas that surface in beginning, conducting, terminating, and even following a psychoanalytic treatment. The most conspicuous ethical matter that has garnered attention within and from outside our field has been that of boundary violations, most notoriously of the sexual kind, and we will be focusing on that subject within our course. We will also be focusing on non-sexual boundary matters, such as self-disclosures, gift exchanges, dual relationships, fee negotiation, and potential conflicts of interest for the analyst. We will discuss how ethical considerations regarding some of these issues may shift over the course of a long treatment. We will touch on reporting obligations for the analyst, and on the candidate’s perspective regarding breaches of ethical conduct. We will assign some readings about ethical considerations inherent in writing about the clinical experience. We will talk about institutional dynamics surrounding an ethical violation. And finally, we will have one class devoted to the ethical perspective regarding informed consent when you begin a psychoanalytic treatment, and engage your patient in a dialogue about the pros and cons of analytic treatment while you are candidates, subject to the impingements of the educational system and the supervisory process.

 

Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy: Similarities and Differences

5 sessions

The course will take up the question of similarities and differences in the practice and goals of psychoanalysis and psychotherapy. One central question that we will continue to discuss throughout the course is whether the difference between analysis and therapy one of kind rather than of degree?  And if it is one of kind, wherein lies the difference? Is it in the outcome, or is it in the practice of both forms of treatment? If of degree, where are the areas of similarity and overlap?

We will also concern ourselves with what I consider to be an issue of identity politics within the field of psychoanalysis, whereby much effort is put into differentiating analysts from therapists, despite a lack of strong research evidence to support this claim. In searching for suitable articles I found close to 300 articles on psychotherapy and psychoanalysis on PEP-Web, yet not a single one in the two listed journals for psychotherapy (British Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy). Should we ascribe significance to this observation? If so, what can we make of it?  And how are we, as a consequence of our training as analysts, influenced to think of therapy as a “lesser” or “simpler” treatment? What impact does that have on our professional identity when most of our practice is composed of therapy patients? What impact does it have on our patients?

 

Relational Theory II

5 sessions 

In this course we will both review some of the relational theory already covered, and do a close reading of other papers not yet read. The papers we will focus on are both theoretical and technical; we will attempt to compare and contrast a relational point of view with that of the more classical. There are different and yet overlapping perspectives within relational theory.


 

YEAR FIVE

Adult Continuous Case Conference

10 sessions 

The central aim and focus of this continuous case is to learn from the case material, learn from each other and to share our analytic ideas, approaches and views.  The case will be a springboard for discussion. The overarching theme will be looking at resistance from many different facets. It should be noted that this theme is loosely devised and we have the flexibility to move in the direction that is inspired by the case material and the group.  In order to help facilitate these discussions we have organized a reading list. While we will touch upon the reading we do not want the reading to be a “resistance” to get into the case material. So the reading is there as a guide with the hopes that it exposes you to some material that can help further facilitate thinking, reflecting on the clinical material and our discussions. 

 

Advanced Writing Seminar

5 sessions

We will be closely following the design of a writing course that has been taught with success in New York at IPE (NYU) by Jennifer Stuart, and using her reading list. We know that all of you are already experienced and enthusiastic writers, and we hope to offer you an opportunity to develop and expand your clinical writing skills in the way that will most benefit you at this point in your career. This could be to fulfill training requirements, for certification, or for professional publication or presentation.

 

Borderline Pathology

5 sessions 

This course will attempt to integrate developments in contemporary psychoanalytic theory with the classic ego-structural approach.  Concepts derived from the differing theoretical paradigms will be studied in relation to their relevant phenomenological problems within the borderline and narcissistic realms.  Historic and author-focused perspective will be used along with an analytic database to address problems in the modifications of technique.


Klein and British Object Relations

10 sessions

This course will address the development of psychoanalysis in Great Britain. It will provide a historical overview of the specific features, tensions, and divergences from the early ‘classical’ approach. Distinction will be made between the work of Mrs. Klein and that of British independent analysts, such as Winnicott, Balint, etc. Longer discourse will pertain to Klein and Winnicott and this will be followed by brief discussions of Fairbairn, Bion, Guntrip, Khan, Klauber, and Coltart. Mention will also be made of important papers by Bollas and Casement. Major concepts introduced by these analysts will be highlighted and their technical significance elucidated with the help of clinical illustrations.

 

Perversions

5 sessions

This course will have students explore the historical development of understanding of perversions, compare and contrast conflict theory from deficit theory in perversion symptomatology, and learn clinical techniques to treat the symptoms of Perversions.

 

Termination

5 sessions

This course will introduce you to the literature and clinical characteristics of the termination phase of analysis.  Many of you will not have yet had an analytic case enter the termination phase, so I am hoping to familiarize you with some of the technical and theoretical elements of this important phase.  We will begin with Freud’s paper on “Analysis Terminable and Interminable” (which, interestingly, isn’t much at all about the termination phase), continue with some of the classic papers about termination, consider why the literature has been slow to develop, and ultimately discuss the subject of post-termination, and the analyst’s various options of approach to post-termination contact. 

 

 

ELECTIVES

MASTERS SERIES

The Masters Series classes are required for Third, Fourth, and Fifth Year Candidates and are open to analytic and psychotherapy members of the Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia. The topics for the Masters Series courses vary each year, but below are examples of course offerings from previous academic years.

 

Bettelheim and Erikson

5 sessions

Bruno Bettelheim and Erik Erikson are two psychoanalytic authors whose works were far ahead of their time and have had an enormous influence on popular culture but very little influence on the culture of psychoanalysis. Starting in the 1950s both authors published a series of groundbreaking works in child, adolescent, and adult development that entailed an implicit psychology of the autonomous, relational but intrapsychically-conflicted Self---the whole person in his or her relational context, engaged in a lifelong process of self-actualization through resolution of inner conflict. 

In doing so, they presented to the educated lay public a vision of psychoanalysis that was alive, accessible and engaging, while within the world of psychoanalysis proper, they never took explicit issue with or announced their radical departure from the more mechanistic, reductionistic non-relational ego psychology that remained the predominant theory in mainstream psychoanalysis until well into the 1980s (except perhaps when Bettelheim wrote about Strachey's systematically mechanistic mistranslation of Freud's humanistic language).  In fact both authors saw their work as honoring and amplifying, not contradicting, Freud. Not surprisingly, however, they were misunderstood or unappreciated, marginalized and largely ignored by mainstream psychoanalysis. To this day, in fact, psychoanalysis suffers from its inability to understand and present itself the way Bettelheim and Erikson were understanding and presenting psychoanalysis to the world more than half a century ago.

This course will provide an overview and all-too-brief sampling of Bettelheim's and Erikson's most important ideas, enough to justify the estimation of their significance to psychoanalysis outlined in this course description.    

 

Kohut and Self-psychology

5 sessions

This class will cover the basic ideas of Kohut’s Self Psychology. Course objectives are: (1) Explain differences between self-psychology and classical psychoanalytic theory. (2)  Explain differences between self-psychology and classical psychoanalytic technique. (3) Apply these ideas to analytic clinical material. To meet these objectives, readings and discussion will address the development of Kohut’s ideas, including: motivation and developmental lines of narcissism, the role of drives, the nuclear self and bipolar self, disintegration anxiety, the centrality of the selfobject and selfobject needs, empathy as a clinical technique, transmuting internalizations, selfobject transferences, and diagnostic considerations within a self-psychology framework.

 

ADVANCED COURSES

Advanced Courses are required for Fourth and Fifth Year Candidates and are open to analytic and psychotherapy members of the Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia. The topics for the Advanced Courses vary each year, but below are examples of course offerings from previous academic years.

 

Basic Psychoanalytic Concepts on Metapsychology, Conflicts, Anxiety and Other Subjects

10 sessions (two 5-week sections)

This is an advanced elective in which we will review and explore, in depth, basic psychoanalytic concepts such as metapsychology, ideas related to internal conflict, anxiety and other related concepts to clinical material presented by the candidates and instructor.

We will read the second edition volume edited by Humberto Nagera published for the Hamstead Clinic Library which is titled with the same name as this course.  “The series of publications of which the present volume forms a part, will be welcomed by all those readers who are concerned with the history of psychoanalytic concepts and interested to follow the vicissitudes of their fate through the theoretical, clinical, and technical writings of psychoanalytic authors.  On one hand, these fates may strike us as being very different from each other.  On the other hand, it proves not too difficult to single out some common trends and to explore the reasons for them”.   We will emphasize the clinical applicability of the ideas and concepts explored in the 18 sections of this volume.

 


Adult Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Program

The Foundational Course entails one year of classes and provides a comprehensive framework for understanding psychoanalytic theory and its application to clinical work.  The curriculum also includes monthly group supervision linked to class topics and Balint process group sessions, both of which are designed to help integrate didactic learning with clinical experience and to facilitate the use of self in our work.

The two-year Intensive Course provides further immersion in psychoanalytic theory and practice for students seeking to deepen what they learned in the Foundational Year or for experienced clinicians seeking to improve their practice of psychoanalytic therapy.  Teaching is supplemented by group supervision that focuses on specific topics and case conferences that follow individual cases over several weeks.

Classes are held weekly on Tuesdays from 6:00pm to 9:00pm, beginning in September, at Rockland Mansion, E. Fairmount Park, 3810Mt. Pleasant Drive, Philadelphia, PA 19121.

All class sessions are one hour and thirty minutes long, and each session offers 1.5 CE/CME credits. Specific class information (date, time, location, instructor) will be provided to students upon acceptance to the program.

 

 

FOUNDATIONAL YEAR


TECHNIQUE

 

Assessment

4 sessions

A psychotherapist and a patient gradually develop a comprehensive understanding of the patient’s problems by the end of a successful psychodynamic treatment. Our attempt to assess patients at the beginning of treatment is limited by many unknowns.  This being said, what can we learn and know from the patient at the beginning and what can we not know?  How is this knowledge similar or different from a traditional psychiatric, psychological or social work interview?  What specifically are we trying to assess and for what purposes? Are there particular techniques that will best inform us?  Are there methods to help engage the patient while heightening their curiosity in order to facilitate the start of a psychotherapeutic process?

 

Core Dynamic Problems

1 session

This course will present a contemporary model of psychodynamic therapy.  We being with a discussion of the notion of the core psychodynamic problem, review each of the six core problems – depression, obsessionality, fear of abandonment, low self-esteem, panic anxiety and trauma – and conclude with a consideration of how to choose the core problem most useful for each patient.

 

Technique I

6 sessions

This introductory course will give an overview of the several steps which precede the actual beginning of an analysis. It will touch on the selection of patients for analysis, and will go into more detail on the establishment of rapport (the beginning of the therapeutic alliance), dealing with all of the practical arrangements for the analysis (the frame), and the preliminary education of the prospective analytic patient. It will also deal briefly with the analytic process, the basic principles of psychoanalytic technique (abstinence, neutrality, anonymity, and confidentiality), the role of the relationship, the concept of boundaries, and the role of countertransference in analysis. 

 

THEORY

 

Classical and Modern Conflict Theory

3 sessions

The goals of this course are to clarify the concept of psychic conflict, to explain pathological and non-pathological solutions to conflict and to demonstrate, with clinical material, the ubiquitous role of compromise formation in mental life.

 

Ethics and Psychodynamic Practice

3 sessions

This course, unlike more traditional courses on “professional ethics”, will concern itself less directly with specific rules or norms about such matters as privacy and confidentiality, boundaries, multiple relationships, record keeping and competency or informed consent, although these will inevitably play into our discussion. In traditional terms, such rules pertain to morality, do not steal, etc. In ethics, we are concerned with constitutive rules, that is, rules that constitute the society or practice in which the regulative rules apply and make them meaningful. Hearkening back especially to Aristotle, our emphasis will be on understanding ethics in this broadened sense, with foundational questions concerning happiness, “health”, what is the good life, and how might therapeutic activity make manifest, exemplify and engage the patient in such a way of living and not just talk about it. We hope that this course will encourage you to think about and beyond the rules and theories you use to guide your work, and to recognize and question implicit assumptions about therapy.

 

Object Relations Theory

4 sessions

The goals of this course are to become aware of the history of object relations theory starting with Freud, describe the differences between Klein’s object relations theory and those of Fairbairn and Winnicott, and apply object relations theory to a psychotherapy case in terms of transference/countertransference.

 

Overview of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy

2 sessions

The beginning of a Psychodynamic Psychotherapy can be a daunting task but it is also a deeply personal journey filled with exciting ups and downs. Living with anxiety, constant questions about one's worth as a therapist, and much uncertainty about where the treatment is going is quite common and not a path for every temperament.

In this Overview of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy, we will discuss foundational theory, technique, and the therapist's “experience” doing therapy.  Each session will have several themes which will be hopefully illustrated by your and my clinical examples. While we won't be able to cover all of the questions raised in the outline, they are meant to stimulate your thinking and feelings about this fascinating subject.

 

Psychopathology

5 sessions

This course aims to understand the seeds of psychopathology from a developmental perspective.

 

Relational Theory

4 sessions

In this course, we will learn some of the key ideas of the Relational perspective in psychoanalytic thinking. Some consider the Relational movement an evolution, others a revolution (a total “paradigm shift.”). What will you make of it? This is a theory class, but we will weave in clinical material to bring the ideas to life as well as ideas about the implications on technique. To these ends, think of clinical experiences that you have had (as patient and as clinician) as you read and as we have class discussions. As opposed to a class set aside for a case presentation, we will integrate clinical material throughout.

 

Self Psychology Theory

3 sessions

This course will track the evolution of self psychology from conflict theory and highlight its conceptualization of development. Key concepts related to understanding of the self, narcissism, and the self psychological approach to treatment will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on the contributions of self psychology to psychotherapy in general, particularly understanding empathy and intersubjectivity.

 

Supportive Psychotherapy

2 sessions

Supportive psychotherapy is often considered a lesser form of therapy and the antithesis of exploratory psychotherapy. The instructor will argue that this is a false and harmful dichotomy and this class will take up the question of whether or not supportive interventions stand in opposition to the psychoanalytic goal of exploration, and if any form of exploratory work is possible without some elements of supportive work and vice versa. The class will also consider the indications for supportive psychotherapy such as acute situations in relatively healthy personalities and severe personality disorders.

Following Rockland (1989), the class will outline core strategies of supportive therapy that consist of (1) gratifying selective drive derivatives, (2) supporting certain adaptive defenses, (3) undermining certain maladaptive defenses, (4) promoting identifications with the therapist, with the aim of modifying superego and ego function, (5) environmental interventions aimed at decreasing external stressors, and (6) encouraging the patient's strengths. The instructor will highlight which strategies require a sophisticated level psychoanalytic knowledge and competence, and how psychoanalytic theory aids in their effective application.

 


DEVELOPMENT

 

Development: Oedipal Phase

4 sessions

This course will offer an understanding of this important phase of child development and its impact on future adult sexual and relational adjustment. We will read and discuss Freud’s theories as well as later theorists who advance and expand Freud’s views. We will compare the developmental tasks of boys and girls as they negotiate this phase for similarities and differences. During our last session, we will discuss a psychotherapy case, which will illuminate Oedipal issues as they present in treatment.

 

 

CLINICAL

 

Balint Group

9 sessions

A Balint group is a group of clinicians who meet regularly and present clinical cases in order to better understand the clinician-patient relationship. The focus of the group is on enhancing the clinician’s ability to connect with and care for the patient. 

A Balint group session begins with a member presenting a case for the group to discuss. The group learns about the patient through the presenter’s story, which includes not only the “facts” of the case but also the presenter’s reactions and responses to the patient. During the facilitated discussion the group members uncover different and new perceptions about the patient's and clinician’s feelings and their experiences with each other. Balint process groups serve to develop a new sensitivity to unconscious processes at work in the therapist-patient relationship, and the role of the facilitators is to help participants examine their experience of the case and also to wonder about the patient’s experience of the treatment.

 

Case Discussion

8 sessions

The Group Supervision class provides a forum for the participants to share clinical material from their daily work. In doing so, an opportunity is created to introduce a psychodynamic perspective for understanding the psychopathology of the patient and also the process that unfolds between therapist and patient as the psychotherapy progresses. Input from the group enriches the dialogue by bringing in different perspectives on the problem / issue presented.

 

 

INTENSIVE YEAR ONE

 

TECHNIQUE

 

Technique: Transference and Countertransference

4 sessions

This class will delve into one of the most important aspects of psychodynamic technique.   We will be learning about transference and countertransference in the therapeutic relationship.  We will divide the papers in the first class and you will be expected to present a short summary of the paper you are assigned to. The final class will be a case presentation and discussion illustrating an aspect of transference and countertransference in the clinical encounter.

 

Technique: Defenses and Resistances

5 sessions

The purpose of this course is to provide you with a brief overview of defense and resistance, as it manifests itself within the clinical process.  By clinical process, I mean to bring together its fundamental role in the psychology of all individuals and how honoring defense and resistance plays a singularly important role in deepening the clinical process safely, thus allowing for an emotionally transformative experience in psychodynamic therapy, while at the same time, the deepening of ever more powerful and complex affects, cognitions and unconscious fantasies can be scary for the patient and the therapist, leading to complex, tricky and potentially transformative transference and countertransference enactments of defense and resistance.  I hope to emphasize this dynamic, mutually focused perspective to each week, even as we establish the basics of defense and resistance in psychoanalytic theory and practice in the first two weeks. 

 

THEORY

 

Borderline Organization

5 sessions

The goals of this course are to describe and compare psychoanalytic theories of borderline personality organization and projective identification, describe and compare psychoanalytic treatment models for borderline personality organization and projective identification, and apply psychoanalytic theories and treatment models of borderline personality organization to clinical process.

 

Depression and Masochism

5 sessions

This course will explore the theoretical underpinnings of depression, both as a clinical state and as an affect.  The course begins with Freud’s concepts of depression as rooted in early object loss and its relation to mourning, through Freud’s differentiation of mourning from the state of depression.  Brenner’s reformulation of depression as an affect state in response to an experienced calamity will be presented in contrast to Freud.  The relationship of masochism to depression though identification with a hated object will be discussed.

The course will have a heavy focus on the presentation and discussion of clinical material provided both by the students and faculty.  Students should be prepared to present case vignettes several times during the course, and to consider presenting a full case presentation during the last class meeting.

 

Gender and Sexuality I

4 sessions

This course is a primer on the psychoanalytic understanding of sexuality and gender beginning with Freud’s initial formulation and covering some of the modifications in theory thereafter. Implications for clinical work will be addressed.

 

Narcissism

5 sessions

We are going to be exploring ways of conceptualizing narcissistic pathology, and in turn, how those conceptualizations inform approaches to psychotherapy. There will be opportunities to discuss interventions that address interpersonal and intrapsychic conflicts in narcissism as well as interventions that provide a holding, mirroring, or containing function. I look forward to hearing any, and all, clinical information you would like to bring to class. If an assigned reading doesn’t feel relevant to your learning objectives, please read an optional article instead. Also, please let me know if you have any questions or concerns about the material, and if you would like additional articles.

 

Neurosis

4 sessions

At its most basic level, neurosis can be understood as repetitive patterns manifested via symptoms that result from conflicts between the ego and the id.  These conflicts are typically created from childhood experiences and trauma.  Patients in psychodynamic psychotherapy often present in distress, which can be understood as their unconscious compromise between these conflicts.  Although each person is unique, there are often common clusters of symptoms that have been categorized into different “neurotic styles.”  In this course, we will review a subset of the category of neurosis and their various psychodynamic presentations.

 

Substance Abuse: Psychodynamic Perspectives

4 sessions

This course provides an overview of the psychoanalytic concepts and theories of substance abuse and addictive disorders. Emphasis will be on current ideas and approaches. We will explore issues including:

            - Differentiating symptomatic substance abuse vs. addiction

            - Etiologic factors in addictive disorders

            - The biology/psychology interface in addictions

            - Integration of 12-Step programs with psychotherapeutic approaches

            - Trauma, helplessness, and addiction

 

DEVELOPMENTAL

 

Development: Adolescence

4 sessions

This course is designed to broaden your knowledge of the psychoanalytic understanding of adolescent development. 

 

CLINICAL

 

Case Conference

Case conferences will center on "clinical moments "where the clinician becomes aware of his or her own unsettling, strong, or surprising emotional response to something said, done or enacted in the clinical encounter. This will become a jumping off point for considering the relationship between spoken and unspoken, conscious and unconscious, and past and present in the therapeutic dyad. Two specific topics will be focused on in separate case conferences: deepening treatment and ending treatment.

 

Case Conference I

4 sessions

 

Case Conference 2

4 sessions

 

Case Discussion

9 sessions

The Case Discussion class provides a forum for the participants to share clinical material from their daily work. In doing so, an opportunity is created to introduce a psychodynamic perspective for understanding the psychopathology of the patient and also the process that unfolds between therapist and patient as the psychotherapy progresses. Input from the group enriches the dialogue by bringing in different perspectives on the problem / issue presented.

 

 

INTENSIVE YEAR TWO

 

TECHNIQUE

 

Technique: Psychoanalytic Process

4 sessions

 

THEORY

 

Trauma and Dissociative Disorders

4 sessions

 

Psychodynamic Group Psychotherapy

5 sessions

In this course, we will be discussing group psychotherapy as a psychotherapeutic treatment modality.  We will discuss briefly the origins of group psychotherapy as a modality, its having branched away from psychoanalysis, and its somewhat recent re-entry into the psychodynamic field as a treatment option.  Most of the course will focus on the nuts and bolts of establishing a long-term psychotherapy group:  the indications for the treatment modality, patient selection, stages of group development, therapeutic factors in operation, leadership stance and techniques, and combining individual with group psychotherapy.  We will spend some time on other kinds of group therapy, such as short-term issue-focused groups and support groups, and we will discuss how they differ from long-term therapy groups.  We will rely mostly on the standard group psychotherapy textbooks, those by Yalom, and Rutan and Stone.  I will also assign several other articles to illustrate some of the points that will be the stimulus for discussion.  Most of all, I hope to share with you my excitement about leading groups, and their potential benefit when added to some patients’ individual treatments.  Moreover, it is fun to learn, and has the ability to increase the breadth and depth of your therapeutic skills.

 

Diversity & Culture

4 sessions

 

Mind & Body

4 sessions

 

Psychosis

4 sessions

 

Eating Disorders

4 sessions

 

Working with Dreams

4 sessions

 

Gender & Sexuality II – Queer & Trans/GNC Identities

4 sessions

 

 

DEVELOPMENT

 

Development: Adulthood
4 sessions

 

 

CLINICAL

Case Conference

Case conferences will center on "clinical moments "where the clinician becomes aware of his or her own unsettling, strong, or surprising emotional response to something said, done or enacted in the clinical encounter. This will become a jumping off point for considering the relationship between spoken and unspoken, conscious and unconscious, and past and present in the therapeutic dyad. Two specific topics will be focused on in separate case conferences: deepening treatment and ending treatment.

 

Case Conference 3

5 sessions

 

Case Conference 4

5 sessions

 

Case Discussion

9 sessions

The Case Discussion class provides a forum for the participants to share clinical material from their daily work. In doing so, an opportunity is created to introduce a psychodynamic perspective for understanding the psychopathology of the patient and also the process that unfolds between therapist and patient as the psychotherapy progresses. Input from the group enriches the dialogue by bringing in different perspectives on the problem / issue presented.

 

Statements of Accreditation


Continuing Medical Education (CME):

These activities have been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association and the Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The American Psychoanalytic Association designates these Live Activities for a maximum of 1.25 or 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ per session (refer to section introductions). Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of these CME programs have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

 

 

Continuing Education for Psychologists (CE):

The Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists.  The Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

 

 

Continuing Education for Social Workers, Marriage and Family Therapists, and Professional Counselors (CE):

In accordance with the requirements of the Commonwealth of PA dated 12/23/06 [PA Code: Title 49, Ch. 47-49], The State Board of Social Workers, Marriage and Family Therapists, and Professional Counselors recognizes the American Psychological Association (APA) as a preapproved provider of continuing education programs for social workers and clinical social workers, marriage and family therapists, and professional counselors in the State of Pennsylvania. The Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education programs.

 

For further information, please contact the administrative office of the Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia.

Rockland – East Fairmount Park

3810 Mt. Pleasant Drive

Philadelphia, PA  19121

215-235-2345

[email protected]